Community service – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:25:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Community service – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ 32 32 City to pay settlement in lawsuit against mosque – The Oakland Press https://sanshinzencommunity.org/city-to-pay-settlement-in-lawsuit-against-mosque-the-oakland-press/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 16:25:09 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/city-to-pay-settlement-in-lawsuit-against-mosque-the-oakland-press/ The city of Troy will pay an undisclosed monetary settlement to a Muslim organization that prevailed in a federal lawsuit over the city’s refusal to allow a mosque to open. The mosque at 3635 Rochester Road, south of Wattles Road, opened in September in a building formerly occupied by a restaurant and banquet hall. Adam […]]]>

The city of Troy will pay an undisclosed monetary settlement to a Muslim organization that prevailed in a federal lawsuit over the city’s refusal to allow a mosque to open.

The mosque at 3635 Rochester Road, south of Wattles Road, opened in September in a building formerly occupied by a restaurant and banquet hall.

Adam Community Center operates the mosque, called First Jamiah Masjid. It is the first Muslim place of worship in the city.

Although the settlement was not disclosed, the Adam Community Center asked the court earlier this year for $1.95 million in attorneys’ fees and actual and punitive damages, according to Council attorney Amy Doukoure. on American Islamic Relations-Michigan. CAIR-MI represented the group.

Adam Community Center filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in 2018, alleging the city unfairly enforced zoning requirements to keep the mosque out.

In a joint statement on Tuesday, November 22, CAIR-MI and the city of Troy announced the “complete and final resolution” of the lawsuit.

“While the parties involved are confident in their respective legal positions, everyone believes that settlement is in everyone’s best interest, especially given the emotionally charged nature of these long-pending cases,” they said. both parties said in the statement.

“The settlement is not an admission of liability but does specify that the property may be used for religious purposes. The mutually agreeable settlement resolves the lawsuit and includes an undisclosed award of monetary damages. The full terms of the settlement are confidential and this press release will serve as the sole source of information.

Troy Mayor Ethan Baker expressed a desire to continue the town’s “positive relationship” with the Muslim group.

“Trojan City Council embraces the multicultural fabric of our city, where there are many varied places for members of our diverse community, including Troy’s first Jamiah Masjid,” Baker said. “We are grateful to have been able to resolve the pending matter out of court and look forward to continuing a positive relationship.”

Adam Community Center has expressed its intention to move forward with its mission to provide religious instruction and community service.

“Adam Community Center is pleased to have this lawsuit behind them and looks forward to having a permanent location in the city where they can provide religious and educational services, engage in community outreach, and do the interfaith work that is at the heart of its mission,” Doukouré said in the statement.

The US Department of Justice also prevailed in a federal lawsuit filed on behalf of Adam Community Center. The DOJ argued that the city violated the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000, which states that government agencies must give religious groups the same consideration given to non-religious groups.

]]>
Church Events, Downstream Activities – The News Herald https://sanshinzencommunity.org/church-events-downstream-activities-the-news-herald/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 07:12:17 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/church-events-downstream-activities-the-news-herald/ Email event information to downriverlife@thenewsherald.com. Provide time, date, location, cost and contact details. Submit announcements at least two weeks before the event. For a complete list, visit www.thenewsherald.com/things-to-do/ Events Salvation Army Activities: Breaking Bread, Community Meals, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12-1 p.m. Breaking Bread, Thanksgiving Meal, November 22, 12-2 p.m. Gift of Warmth Coat Drive, collection […]]]>

Email event information to downriverlife@thenewsherald.com. Provide time, date, location, cost and contact details. Submit announcements at least two weeks before the event. For a complete list, visit www.thenewsherald.com/things-to-do/

Events

Salvation Army Activities: Breaking Bread, Community Meals, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12-1 p.m. Breaking Bread, Thanksgiving Meal, November 22, 12-2 p.m. Gift of Warmth Coat Drive, collection until 30 november. coats at one of the Downriver Martinizing locations or the Salvation Army Downriver Corps. Downriver Gift of Warmth Coat Giveaway, December 3, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Red Kettle campaign will begin on November 11. If you are interested in volunteering to ring the bell, please visit www.registertoring.com. The Salvation Army Downstream Corps Community Center is located at 1258 Biddle Avenue, Wyandotte. For more information, call 734-282-0930.

Current events

Mentally Ill Support Group: For relatives and friends of the mentally ill in the Downriver area, meets the 2nd Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at Dearborn First Presbyterian Church, 600 N. Brady, Mitchell Hall. Another support group meets on the 3rd Wednesday of each month at the Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital Rehabilitation Building. 2nd Floor, Room 232. Wear a mask and enter the hospital through the main entrance for a COVID-19 check. Then you will follow the letter A on the wall signs and take the Allen elevators to the 2nd floor. From the elevator exit, turn left and immediately right to follow the hallway to room 232. For information, call 313-292-3324.

Community Meals at Southpoint Church: Free hot meals for those in need on Tuesday evenings from 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Southpoint Church 5699 Fort Street, Trenton.

Sunday School: St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Youth, 2803 1st Street, Wyandotte, holds Sunday School for children in kindergarten through fifth grade every Sunday at 10 a.m. The youth group meets once a month for a community service project and Bible lesson for classes. sixth to 12th. Face masks are mandatory until further notice in the St. Stephen’s building. For more information, call 734-284-8777 or email ststepyouth@gmail.com.

Rockwood Pantry: Rockwood First Congregational Church, 22600 Mather Street Rockwood, hosts a toilet pantry, which provides personal hygiene items, cleaning supplies, lightly used clothing, and some food items. All items are free. The pantry will be open from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. on the last Monday of each month. If this Monday is a public holiday, the pantry will be open the previous Monday. For more information, call 734-379-3711 or fccrockwood.org

Downriver Women’s Social Group: Join women at Rockwood First Congregational Church, 22600 Mather Street, Thursdays, 10 a.m. to approximately 1 p.m., for conversation and friendship. Some ring crafts for working or board games/playing cards. Some arrive late or leave early, others bring a lunch bag and eat together. No contribution; No religious affiliation required. We wear masks and enter through the side door. For more information, call Emily Dye at 248-478-3412.

Holy Hours with Rosary Display, Divine Mercy Rosary, and Blessing: Sponsored by the Knights of Columbus the second Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. before the 7 p.m. Mass at Our Lady of the Scapular at Our Lady of the Mount Carmel, Tenth Street and Superior Blvd., Wyandotte. Everyone is invited, not just the Knights.

Food Pantry: Every Thursday, DownRiver Church hosts an Emergency Food Pantry for a day-long food supplement for individuals and families living in DownRiver communities. The pantry is open every Thursday between 10 a.m. and noon. Participants must bring their driver’s license or state-issued ID to participate. DownRiver Church is located at 14400 Beech Daly, Taylor. For more information, call the church office at 734-442-6100.

DownRiver Church Worship Service: Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Strict social distancing guidelines are in effect. A mask covering the mouth and nose is required to enter the building. If you don’t feel well, don’t come to worship; stay home and stay safe. Let us know if you feel unwell so we can pray for you www.drumc.org/prayerroom. Online worship is also available via Facebook Live every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. https://www.facebook.com/DownRiverUMC. DownRiver Church is located at 14400 Beech Daly (between Northline and Eureka) in Taylor. For questions, email: office@drumc.org or call 734-442-6100.

Our Lady of the Scapular Parish: Masses are held Saturdays at 5 p.m. (streamed live on Facebook and available on YouTube), Sundays at 9 a.m. (Polish/English) and 11 a.m. (English). Masses on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday take place at 7 p.m. Friday mass is at 12 p.m. except the first Friday when it is at 7 p.m. The church is located at 976 Pope John Paul II Avenue, Wyandotte. For more information, visit OurLadyoftheScapular.org or call 734-284-9135.

Celebrate Recovery: Celebrate Recovery is a biblically balanced 12-step recovery program that helps people overcome hurts, blockages, and habits; it is a Christ-centered program that uses the teachings of Jesus to help individuals break free from painful life issues and addictive behaviors in a safe, anonymous, and confidential environment; the program is offered at 6 p.m. every Tuesday at Kirby Church, 2773 Will Carleton Road, Flat Rock; for more information, call 734-789-1260.

Christian Business Men’s Connection: Luncheon meeting the third Monday of each month from noon to 1 p.m. at Ramsey’s, in Trenton, 2747 Jefferson, just north of West Road. Lunch, guest speakers, open discussions, non-denominational. Lunch is free for new participants. For more information, call John at 734-692-1421 or Milton at 734-675-8999.

Recharge: First United Methodist Church of Flat Rock, 28400 Evergreen, hosts Recharge at 6:30 p.m. on the first, second, and fourth Wednesdays and includes songs and a short uplifting message and time for prayer; the evening is meant to help kick-start the rest of the week. For more information, 734-782-2565.

Hours of Service: Spirit of Truth Family Church holds Sunday service at 11:30 a.m. at 3744 Carleton-Rockwood Road, South Rockwood, and at 6:30 p.m. Sundays and Wednesdays at 22144 North Huron River Drive, Rockwood.

]]>
DAR, Democrats, Fleet Reserve and more https://sanshinzencommunity.org/dar-democrats-fleet-reserve-and-more/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 07:18:44 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/dar-democrats-fleet-reserve-and-more/ GDR The Lovely Purchase Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, will meet on November 14 with registration and meeting beginning at 9:30 a.m. and business beginning at 10:00 a.m. This meeting will feature guest speaker Jake Greening, a U.S. Army Veteran, who will speak on “The Veterans’ Wall of Honor: A Tribute to All Who […]]]>

GDR

The Lovely Purchase Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, will meet on November 14 with registration and meeting beginning at 9:30 a.m. and business beginning at 10:00 a.m. This meeting will feature guest speaker Jake Greening, a U.S. Army Veteran, who will speak on “The Veterans’ Wall of Honor: A Tribute to All Who Have Served Since 1776”.

The group meets on the second Monday of each month in the chapel of Bella Vista First United Methodist Church, 20 Boyce Drive. The DAR is a patriotic organization for women passionate about community service, the preservation of history and the education of children, as well as honoring and supporting those who serve our nation. Visitors are welcome.

For further information: susie.bellinski@me.com.

Computers

The Bella Vista Computer Club will meet at 7 p.m. on Nov. 14 at the Highland Crossings Center, Room 1001, 1801 Forest Hills Blvd. in Bella Vista. The program will be “Internet Shopping for the Holidays” with Ginny Vance.

This will be an in-person meeting with Zoom simulcast.

The following courses are currently scheduled for November:

• November 9: “Why, when and how to back up your C drive?”, with Pete Opland, from 9:00 to 11:00

• November 15 – “Basic Computer Security, Part 2”, with Justin Sell, from 2 to 4 p.m.

• November 30 – “Slow PC? Let’s Upgrade or Buy New,” with Pete Opland, 9:00-11:00 a.m.

Information: bvcomputerclub.org.

Democrats

Northwest Arkansas senior Democrats will gather at noon Nov. 15 in the Fayetteville Public Library’s Walker Community Room for a business meeting and discussion of the upcoming legislative session. The meeting will be hybrid with a Zoom option.

Information: (479) -841-4420.

Mind games

Puzzles will meet at 3 p.m. on November 16 in the Community Room at the Bella Vista Public Library. Everyone is welcome.

For further information: Contact patkirby49@gmail.com.

Mystery Book Club

Mystery Book Club meets the third Wednesday of the month in the Bella Vista Public Library Conference Room. This month’s meeting is at 4 p.m. November 16 at 4 p.m. The subject is to read a western mystery.

For further information: Contact patkirby49@gmail.com.

Reserve fleet

The Fleet Reserve Association will meet at noon Nov. 19 at the Wagon Wheel Country Cafe, 4080 N. Thompson St. in Springdale. FRA meets on the third Saturday of the month.

Information: (479) 841-4856 or email vic.walker65@gmail.com.

garden club

The Bella Vista Garden Club hosted a card and board game party on October 21 to benefit scholarships and other club projects. It was a great success and nearly 200 guests attended. Club president Pat Meyer looks forward to making it an annual event.

Bella Vista Garden Club meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of the month at Bella Vista Community Church, 75 E. Lancashire Blvd. There are no meetings in July, August or November.

Hill N Dale

The Hill N Dale Hiking Club will be hiking Nov. 21 at Mount Kessler near Fayetteville on the Last Call, Fayetteville Traverse, Rock City, Amp, and Terrapin trails. This will be a 5.7 mile loop hike.

Information: bvhikingclub.com, (479) 721-2193 or munster@olemac.net.

Perfect harmony

Perfect Harmony Women’s Barbershop Chorus meets from 3-4:30 p.m. every Monday in Fellowship Hall at Highland Christian Church, 1500 Forest Hills Blvd. in Bella Vista. Regular rehearsals will resume in the spring. To attend, you must have received at least the first dose of the covid vaccine. No previous experience or trial is required to register. Women of all ages and voice ranges to experience Barbershop Singing are welcome.

Information: (479) 876-7204.

duvet guild

The Quilt Guild of Northwest Arkansas is sponsoring a $500 scholarship in 2023 to a high school graduate or current student from Washington, Benton, Carroll, and Madison counties pursuing a degree in fiber arts. The scholarship is to be used for educational expenses such as tuition, books, and workshop fees.

The guild was formed to promote appreciation of the rich heritage of the art of quilting and to enhance each member’s quilting skills and knowledge. It is also the purpose of the organization to expand and enrich the art of quilting for future generations.

The scholarship application form is available on the website. Completed applications should be mailed to QUILT Guild of Northwest Arkansas, Scholarship Committee Chair, PO Box 1364, Springdale, AR 72765 postmarked no later than February 1, 2023. Be sure to allow a slow postal service and ensure adequate postage is paid as this may result in late delivery beyond the deadline.

For further information: quiltguildnwa@gmail.com.

Send club news to ourtown@nwadg.com. Deadline is 4 p.m. Tuesday for posting on Sunday. Please include a phone number or email address for posting.

Submitted photo Outgoing Kiwanis club president Stephen Johnston (left) poses with Rotary club president Stanley Church during the Rotary club meeting on Tuesday, October 25. Johnston, Director of Operations for the Boys and Girls Club of Western Benton County spoke about what the Boys and Girls Club has to offer children in Siloam Springs and Western Benton County.
Photo Westside Eagle Observer/SUSAN HOLLAND Karen Benson (seated, center), director of the Gravette Public Library, greets guests at a volunteer appreciation reception held Friday afternoon at the library. Benson thanked the volunteers in attendance and shared what contributions they have made to support the library. Guests were served cheese and crackers, grapes, cookies, cheesecake bites and punch.
Photo Photo submitted The Bella Vista Ladies 9 Hole Golf League celebrated Halloween with a brunch on October 31. The league plays from March to October.
]]>
How a teen center transformed a city | Culture & Leisure https://sanshinzencommunity.org/how-a-teen-center-transformed-a-city-culture-leisure/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/how-a-teen-center-transformed-a-city-culture-leisure/ Six years ago, downtown Kamiah didn’t have much street life. In this town of more than 1,000 people on the banks of the Clearwater River, “nothing to do for young people” was a common complaint. Today, a thriving teen center in the heart of downtown provides teenagers with a place to hang out after school […]]]>

Six years ago, downtown Kamiah didn’t have much street life. In this town of more than 1,000 people on the banks of the Clearwater River, “nothing to do for young people” was a common complaint.

Today, a thriving teen center in the heart of downtown provides teenagers with a place to hang out after school and on weekends. Pool and ping pong tables, table football, games, books and a big screen TV will keep you entertained. Homework help and tutoring are available, as well as life skills classes, service projects, and crafts for younger children. It is also a starting point for free or low-cost adventure and cultural trips in the region.

It started with $75

A safe place for teenagers

Giving more work to teenagers

Give back to the community

“Endless” support

]]>
Free menstrual products available at Shidler College https://sanshinzencommunity.org/free-menstrual-products-available-at-shidler-college/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 00:13:43 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/free-menstrual-products-available-at-shidler-college/ Free menstrual products are now available in all Shidler College of Business washrooms thanks to a new partnership between Delta Sigma Pi: Ro Chi at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa’s Shidler college and local non-profit organization May Movement Hawaii. Susan Iverson is Vice President of Community Service for Delta Sigma Pi:Ro Chi. Delta Sigma […]]]>

Free menstrual products are now available in all Shidler College of Business washrooms thanks to a new partnership between Delta Sigma Pi: Ro Chi at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa’s Shidler college and local non-profit organization May Movement Hawaii.

person smiling with a box
Susan Iverson is Vice President of Community Service for Delta Sigma Pi:Ro Chi.

Delta Sigma Pi is an international professional business fraternity with four main pillars: professionalism, service, scholarship and fellowship. The group’s vice president of community service, Susan Iverson, said this project aligns specifically with its community service and service-learning goals.

“My goal was to collaborate not only with national nonprofits, but also to focus on local nonprofits with initiatives focused on Native Hawaiian issues, whether land, culture or people,” said Iverson, a senior human resources specialist. and accountant. “Another focal point of this pillar within our chapter is service learning. We have often found many people volunteering just for credit and walking away aimlessly. Therefore, by educating members about organizing for they volunteer and how they are making a difference, member participation and motivation has increased.

All menstrual products were donated by May Movement Hawaiiwho “believes it is our kuleana, or responsibility, that all people of menstruating age have the right to access sanitary products, safe and hygienic places to use them, and the right to manage their bodies without shame or stigma.”

According to data provided by May Movement Hawaii on the period of poverty in Hawaii, 42% of recipients identify as native Hawaiians and 16% identify as other Pacific Islander; half of respondents missed school or work because of their period; and 65% of beneficiaries receive government assistance – programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children that do not make toilet paper and products accessible. menstrual.

paper towel box and dispenser on a wall
All products were donated by May Movement Hawaii.

Iverson said the initiative began in early October and the reception has been overwhelmingly positive. She is in charge of restocking the products and says they need to be replenished weekly. Iverson said she has also received many positive comments on social media.

Governor David Ige signed Senate Bill 2821 earlier this year which requires the Department of Education to provide free menstrual products in all public and charter schools. Iverson is gathering data and commentary on the Shidler Initiative in hopes of spurring lawmakers to extend the law to higher education institutions.

“I am lucky to have this connection not only with May Movement Hawaii but the people who also support him on campus as we try to make an impact on campus and in Hawaii“Iverson said.

]]>
The DHS Community Club Hosts a Fall Festival https://sanshinzencommunity.org/the-dhs-community-club-hosts-a-fall-festival/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 21:13:23 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/the-dhs-community-club-hosts-a-fall-festival/ Although relatively new, the Davis High School Community Club is already making great strides in its mission to strengthen community bonds through volunteer efforts. Next on its calendar of fun events is the Fall Festival which is open to everyone – but especially kids – looking to discover their passions. DHSCC was born about a […]]]>

Although relatively new, the Davis High School Community Club is already making great strides in its mission to strengthen community bonds through volunteer efforts. Next on its calendar of fun events is the Fall Festival which is open to everyone – but especially kids – looking to discover their passions.

DHSCC was born about a year ago when Founder and President Bailey Paquette and a few friends had the idea to change the perception of volunteerism. Rather than being something boring that students only do because it looks good on a college application, this ambitious Blue Devil wants to change the view of community service into something fun and positive that everyone the world can enjoy do together.

Through a collaboration with the Alliance for Education Solutions, this student-run organization earned its non-profit status and has never looked back. Paquette is the president, Grace Hadani is the vice-president, Monica Garibay is the secretary and Cody Leveau is the treasurer.

“Our club organizes monthly events. About half of them we make ourselves and the other half we either find a community group, organization or event in Davis or Sacramento that we want to support and we all go out as a big group to help said Paquette. “The last event we went to was the Walk to End Alzheimer’s in Sacramento and it was about 50 volunteers. We just hang out and make it as fun as possible and change the perspective of community service by helping everybody.

Not only do these helpful blue devils provide volunteers, outreach and elbow grease to organizations and events in need, but they organize events themselves. One of those events was a special needs craft fair last May in Rancho Cordova with over 150 families in attendance.

If the resounding success of the craft fair is any indication of DHSCC’s ability to put on a successful event, the Davis community is in for a treat on Nov. ‘fall. Of course, Paquette gives a lot of credit and appreciation to the Chang Foundation which sponsors DHSCC with grants for future events and funds the Fall Festival itself.

“This is our first DHSCC event of the school year and our goal is to provide Davis and Sacramento area youth with an opportunity to connect and discover their passions in our community,” said Paquette. . “We therefore invite as many youth organizations in our region as possible to hold their own activity booth and promote their businesses. It will be completely free for organizations and participants.

“We want to give young people in our region, especially after this difficult period of Covid and isolation from the outside world, the opportunity to find themselves in our community now that things are starting to reopen. These young participants will be able to come to our fair, go to each booth and play the games that the booth has to offer. If they are interested, they can inquire at the kiosks and learn more about these organizations with their parents.

The fall festival should also include raffles, games, food trucks, craft music and more – but what more could you want from a festival?

It’s all happening Nov. 19 at North Davis Elementary School MPR, 555 E 14th St., from noon to 2:30 p.m. To stay up to date, check the DHSCC website at https://6306c4a49e3ca.site123. me/or visit their Instagram account by searching @dhscommunityclub. If anyone has any questions – like how to donate to DHSCC or otherwise – they can also reach out directly to dhscommunityclub@gmail.com.

Local News in Davis is proudly sponsored by

]]>
Friends of Wilson Lake Receive Community Service Award – Daily Bulldog https://sanshinzencommunity.org/friends-of-wilson-lake-receive-community-service-award-daily-bulldog/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 12:11:53 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/friends-of-wilson-lake-receive-community-service-award-daily-bulldog/ Front row: Renee Whitley, outgoing Speaker of the House and Sandy Muller, President of FOWL.Back row: Incoming House Speaker Lee Nile, Wynn Muller, FOWL Treasurer, Rob Lively, FOWL Vice President. (Photo provided.) WILTON – The Friends of Wilson Lake (FOWL) are very pleased to announce that they received the 2022 Community Service Award from the […]]]>
Front row: Renee Whitley, outgoing Speaker of the House and Sandy Muller, President of FOWL.
Back row: Incoming House Speaker Lee Nile, Wynn Muller, FOWL Treasurer, Rob Lively, FOWL Vice President. (Photo provided.)

WILTON – The Friends of Wilson Lake (FOWL) are very pleased to announce that they received the 2022 Community Service Award from the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce at the chamber’s annual meeting held in Farmington, October 18, 2022. The prize was unexpected, but much appreciated!

During the presentation of the award, incoming Speaker of the Chamber, Lee Nile, spoke of FOWL’s many efforts to ensure and maintain the water quality of Lake Wilson and its watershed: monitoring oxygen levels, lake temperature and phosphorus; the courtesy boat inspection program where boats are checked entering and leaving the lake for invasive plants; community education programs at Academy Hill School; and offering free boat rides during the Blueberry Festival and at other times. FOWL also maintains close ties with University of Maine Farmington faculty who, along with their students, provide valuable advice and services.

Congratulatory letters were also received from Senator Susan M. Collins and Congressman Jared F. Golden.

The award is a testament to the great relationship that exists between the community and organizations like FOWL: together we experience the true meaning of ‘Community’.

Printable, PDF and email version
]]>
Ceremony Honoring Justice O’Grady, Other Danbury Area Highlights https://sanshinzencommunity.org/ceremony-honoring-justice-ogrady-other-danbury-area-highlights/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 09:04:51 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/ceremony-honoring-justice-ogrady-other-danbury-area-highlights/ A ceremony Thursday will recognize the late Judge Daniel O’Grady’s legacy. Friends and colleagues have commissioned a plaque in her honor to be placed upstairs near the probate court at Bethel City Hall. O’Grady was a judge of Bethel Probate Court from 1991 to 2011 and a judge of Northern Fairfield County Probate Court from […]]]>

A ceremony Thursday will recognize the late Judge Daniel O’Grady’s legacy.

Friends and colleagues have commissioned a plaque in her honor to be placed upstairs near the probate court at Bethel City Hall.

]]>
Election 2022: Carson City Board of Supervisors, Ward 1 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/election-2022-carson-city-board-of-supervisors-ward-1/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 04:23:15 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/election-2022-carson-city-board-of-supervisors-ward-1/ 4 year term Wade Bradshaw Address: Occupation: Electronics Technician Age: 50 years old Contact: support@wadeforthewin.com www.wadeforthewin.com FB: wade for victory Wade Bradshaw Education: Tonopah High School – Tonopah, NV Western Nevada College – Associates in Electronic Technology University of Phoenix (Reno Campus) – Bachelor of Science in Information Technology Why are you running?: Carson City […]]]>

4 year term

Wade Bradshaw

Address:

Occupation: Electronics Technician

Age: 50 years old

Contact:

support@wadeforthewin.com

www.wadeforthewin.com

FB: wade for victory

Wade Bradshaw

Education:

Tonopah High School – Tonopah, NV

Western Nevada College – Associates in Electronic Technology

University of Phoenix (Reno Campus) – Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

Why are you running?:

Carson City has grown and changed over my years here. Residents feel that council is making decisions without their perspective. I want to incorporate the residents’ perspective into council’s deliberations to reach a balanced decision. Being entrenched in the same public environment for many years can lead to linear thinking. I want to bring my private sector experience and technical background to ask critical questions to get the best outcome for the city. I’m your savvy curator for this job.

Briefly describe the main tasks of the position for which you are applying:

Three parts: a) Enacting laws for the Unified Municipality of Carson City, consistent with the United States Constitution and Nevada Revised Statutes and City Ordinances, b) Overseeing City Services to Serve Our Residents, and c) Listening residents and put them in touch with services so that their problems can be resolved.

A brief statement about your platform:

Public safety is a priority. General well-being and safety are paramount. We must continue to fund our local law enforcement at a level that ensures our community is safe and that all emergency services are available when and where the public needs them. Having a safe community attracts families and creates a healthy and productive community.

Carson City will continue to grow. Growth often presents challenges such as the expansion of our infrastructure and the demand on our natural resources. We must ensure that this rate of growth and our natural resources are constantly monitored and balanced. I will take input from City staff as well as the community to make the difficult trade-offs and priorities while being fiscally responsible to our ratepayers.

Updating the master plan and aligning it with city ordinances is essential. Work with the community to ensure everyone, including all stakeholders, understands city ordinances. It is our shared responsibility to create the vision of a future Carson City for all residents and not for special interest groups.

We have learned many lessons from the COVID emergency and I will work to protect your family, your home and your livelihood.

What makes you the most qualified candidate for this position?

As the Electronic Claims Coordinator for the Nevada Medicaid Supporting Tax Agent, I conducted training workshops and worked cooperatively with Medicaid providers to resolve systems issues.

Currently, I am employed at Bently Nevada, a private company of Baker Hughes, which provides energy technology services – making energy safer, cleaner and more efficient. My ability to communicate and rely on my colleague’s expertise has allowed us to provide engineering data to our customers. This technical experience will allow me to analyze data and ask the critical questions needed to bring all aspects of the issues facing our community into board discussions.

Coming from a family business, I understand the importance of small businesses to thrive. That same family business experience instilled in me a deep sense of commitment, a dedication to service, and an understanding of the attributes of success.
For me, the foundation and success of a public servant begins with listening to residents about their concerns. The public forums will be a focal point for me; encourage community participation in creating.

Stacey Giomi

Address: PO Box 188, Carson City, NV 89702-0188

Occupation: Director of Facilities and Emergency Preparedness for Nevada Nonprofit Health Centers.

Age: 60 years old

Contact:
www.staceygiomi.com

electstaceygiomi@gmail.com

Stacey Giomi

Service status, including function, military or civil service:

Elected to serve as Ward 1 Supervisor on the Carson City Board of Supervisors for a term that began in January 2019, which is my current position. As a Board Representative, I am Vice President of the Nevada Counties Association, District President of the Carson Water Sub-Conservancy, and a member of the Carson City Tourism Authority. I retired from the Carson City Fire Department in 2015 after a career spanning over 31 years where I served in all ranks of the service before retiring as Fire Chief and Chief Operating Officer emergencies. I am appointed by the Governor to the State Indigent Accident Fund. Previously, I served several Nevada governors as a representative on the State Homeland Security Funding Committee, the State Emergency Response Commission, and the Coordinating Council of the emergency management. I am a former member of the 9-1-1 Surcharge Advisory Committee, the Debit Management Commission and the Charter Review Committee.

I have served various local and national non-profit organizations over the years, including:

Current President of Advocates to End Domestic Violence

Current secretary of the Rural Nevada Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) Board of Directors

Past President of the Nevada Association of Fire Chiefs

Advisory Board Member, UNR Cooperative Extension, Fire Adapted Communities Advisory Board

Education:

I have two BScs from Cogswell College. One in public administration/fire and one in fire prevention technology. I graduated Summa Cum Laude in both degree programs.

Why are you running?

In my role as fire chief and now as a member of the board of directors, I have developed a deep connection with the people of this community. My compassion for the people I serve drives me to make decisions based on my leadership, my integrity and my extensive experience as a public servant. Carson City deserves someone who will be dedicated to maintaining our quality of life and making Carson City a great place to live, work and play.

Briefly describe the main tasks of the position for which you are applying:
The Carson City Board of Supervisors is the political and legislative body of the Consolidated Municipality of Carson City. We are responsible for making ordinances, approving an annual budget and supervising – broadly defined – the functions of the city.

A brief statement about your platform:

In my opinion, the most important job of an elected official is to ensure the health, safety and well-being of the citizens of that community. Elected officials cannot be narrow-minded and focus on one issue because our community has many priorities.

Public safety is certainly a top priority and I have strongly supported the fire department, sheriff’s department, district attorney’s office, alternative sentencing department and the courts by endorsing and expanding key programs aimed at improve public safety. I will continue to be a strong advocate for public safety in the years to come.

Infrastructure is an essential part of our community. Drinking water, wastewater treatment and stormwater management are key elements of my platform. Improvements to these essential pieces of infrastructure ensure that residents of Carson City are safe in their homes.

We must continue to ensure that we have manageable and sustainable growth – to do this we must update our master plan and give our residents of today the opportunity to contribute to this valuable document.

Most importantly, all of this must be done in a way that is fiscally responsible and reflects our values ​​and quality of life.

What makes you the most qualified candidate for this position:

Stephen Covey, author and educator, said, “What you do has a far greater impact than what you say.” I have a demonstrated history of service to this community, dating back to my time as a volunteer firefighter in 1979, to my time over the past four years as your Ward 1 Supervisor. In those 43 years, I learned a thing or two about what’s important to this community. Assuming personal responsibility, a moral code, a strong work ethic, being fiscally responsible with taxpayer dollars, a helping hand not a gift forever, helping your neighbors, resilience in the face of adversity and tragedy, cooperation between city and state agencies, giving every citizen a voice and allowing that voice to be heard, treating each other with respect and never forgetting that anyone working in city government is ultimately a servant of the public.

I have lived my professional and personal life using these broad guidelines to try to ensure that I leave our community a better place when my job is done.

I believe my proven track record, my background in community service, my dedication to helping others, and my compassion and integrity give me an edge in my role as a public servant. If re-elected to the Board of Supervisors, I pledge to dedicate myself to these values ​​and to making Carson City the best place to live in our great state.

]]>
New California program helps dreamers in limbo pay for college with jobs https://sanshinzencommunity.org/new-california-program-helps-dreamers-in-limbo-pay-for-college-with-jobs/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/new-california-program-helps-dreamers-in-limbo-pay-for-college-with-jobs/ UC Davis College Corps member Yusbely Delgado Medrano speaks during a Scholars Swearing-In Ceremony in Sacramento on Oct. 7. Photo by Rahul Lal for CalMatters Natalia Angeles always knew she was going to college despite being undocumented, so giving up the chance to attend a four-year college right out of high school wasn’t easy. But […]]]>
College student
UC Davis College Corps member Yusbely Delgado Medrano speaks during a Scholars Swearing-In Ceremony in Sacramento on Oct. 7. Photo by Rahul Lal for CalMatters

Natalia Angeles always knew she was going to college despite being undocumented, so giving up the chance to attend a four-year college right out of high school wasn’t easy. But when acceptance came from the University of California, Riverside, she soon realized that without being able to work legally, she couldn’t afford to attend.

“I didn’t know what resources to look for when it came to helping me with school and stuff,” Angeles said. “And then when I noticed that UC Riverside wasn’t the perfect fit for me financially, I decided to just do community college.”

Angeles attended East Los Angeles College, then eventually transferred to Long Beach State. A local nonprofit helped Angeles, a skilled photographer, find work taking portraits for $45 each. She uses the money to cover her personal expenses, but does not know how she will earn money to pay for her studies in the future.

Working part-time — or even full-time — is an important part of many students’ college plans, especially as the cost of living in California continues to rise. But California’s roughly 75,000 undocumented students aren’t eligible for federal co-op programs or most job opportunities, and many are struggling to make ends meet.

A new public service program launching this month, #CaliforniansForAll College Corps, will give hundreds of them the opportunity to earn money for college while doing community service. It’s the latest in a number of California efforts to help undocumented students pay for their education.

College Corps Fellows will learn from community organizations, undertake projects in public schools, fight food insecurity, and fight climate change. Fellows receive up to $10,000 for completing one year of service, which includes a living allowance and scholarship.

“Our overall goal is to get more people involved in service and to have more people working in the community to solve big problems,” said Josh Fryday, director of California services, whose office runs College. Body.

With 3,200 vacancies, College Corps has hosted approximately 570 scholarship recipients who are AB 540 California Dream Act students, meaning they do not have legal residency in California but attended high school here and are eligible for resident tuition. It was launched the same week that a federal appeals court ruled that Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program that grants work permits and protection from deportation to certain undocumented student arrivals in the country as children violated immigration law.

Ongoing legal battles over DACA have increased stress for undocumented students. In a 2020 survey of about 1,300 undocumented college students in California, 96% said they worried about not having enough money to pay for things, with 60% worrying most of the time, almost always or always.

“Historically, unfortunately, the service has excluded people. We hope with this program that the message we are sending from California is clear that we truly appreciate our Dreamers,” Fryday said. “We know how much they can help make this world a better place for all of us.”

Yusbely Delgado, a student at the University of California, Davis, told CalMatters how grateful she is for opportunities like College Corps. Delgado wanted to be a pediatrician since high school, but during her sophomore year, she says, her father told her she might not be able to because of her immigration status. Delgado persisted, taking advanced placement courses and applying for DACA.

“I had planned my whole life,” she said.

Then, just before starting at UC Davis, a federal judge blocked new applicants from the DACA program. Delgado applied for a job on campus after learning that they were accepting AB 540 students like her. But after going through training, she says, she learned she wasn’t eligible.

“It was a very upsetting time,” she said.

As one of the 2022-2023 College Corps Scholars, Delgado is currently creating a program for sixth graders at local schools. “Our mission is to encourage low-income students to go to college,” she said.

Before California implemented policies to support undocumented students who wanted to attend college, students had to find creative ways to pay for their education, said Eric Yang, coordinator of the undocumented student program at the University. UC Riverside. These included crowdfunding and finding private scholarships that did not require citizenship.

“It was basically the wild Wild West, where everyone was kind of alone,” he said. “Even though a lot of people were going through the same thing, there just wasn’t enough unification in institutions and in the state.”

This changed dramatically with the passage of Assembly Bill 540 in 2001, exempting certain students who attended California high schools but were not legal residents of California from paying nonresident tuition in public universities. The California Dream Act of 2011 made these same students eligible for state financial aid.

Yet undocumented students still struggle financially. Centers for undocumented students at universities work with local nonprofits and their own institutions to spread information about career opportunities through flyers, social media, or simply word of mouth.

“Some (undocumented students) will pay out of pocket, with potential work under the table,” Yang said.

In 2019, the California Student Aid Commission launched the California Dream Act Service Incentive Grant program, allowing low-income California Dream Act students with a minimum high school GPA of 2.00 to perform community service and receive up to $2,250 per semester.

The program had room for 2,500 students, but only 100 had enrolled as of fall 2021, according to a report from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office. The pandemic has disrupted service opportunities and students may have sought out higher-paying gigs, the report said. This program is now merging with College Corps.

College Corps intended to work with trusted messengers to reach the undocumented community, Fryday said.

“We did a lot of outreach in multiple languages,” he said. “We did a lot of media and specific interviews in Spanish to make sure we reached the parents of these students, which we found to be a very effective way of motivating the students.”

College Corps hopes to use its success as leverage to get the state legislature to expand the program to more college campuses, Fryday said.

Delgado said it’s sometimes difficult to navigate the maze of career preparation and figure out what opportunities are open to AB 540 students. “I wish I could live my life without those little things. I wish to be able to enjoy my time in Davis. But I can’t because I have to read the fine print,” she said.

Still, she hasn’t given up on her goal of becoming a pediatrician. Because she wouldn’t qualify for a medical license now, she said, she plans to start by getting her master’s degree in counseling or psychology and gaining more experience working with children.

“I know as long as I follow the lead, it will eventually pay off,” she said.

González is a member of the CalMatters College Journalism Network, a collaboration between CalMatters and student journalists across California. This story and other articles on higher education are supported by the College Futures Foundation.

]]>