Community – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:48:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Community – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ 32 32 Community gathers after someone burns pride flag outside church https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-gathers-after-someone-burns-pride-flag-outside-church/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:48:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-gathers-after-someone-burns-pride-flag-outside-church/ Residents of Canal Winchester gathered at the United Church of Christ of David to pray and send a message after someone burned a Pride flag outside the church. CANAL WINCHESTER, Ohio — A community came together to show their support for the LGBTQ community after a pride flag was lit on fire outside a church […]]]>

Residents of Canal Winchester gathered at the United Church of Christ of David to pray and send a message after someone burned a Pride flag outside the church.

CANAL WINCHESTER, Ohio — A community came together to show their support for the LGBTQ community after a pride flag was lit on fire outside a church in Canal Winchester on Tuesday night.

Hours after the news broke, people gathered outside the United Church of Christ of David to pray and show their support.

“It’s an inclusive church where everyone is welcome,” Reverend James Semmelroth Darnell said.

Darnell said he started receiving calls, texts and emails early Wednesday morning from people who saw the flag being burned outside his church.

He said that for now, the flag remains up.

“It says we’re still here. We still send that message of love and affirmation to the community,” Darnell said.

For Jonelle Lancaster, who came to support the church on Wednesday, the flag is a symbol of all the hardships members of the LGBTQ community have had to endure. She said it was a teaching moment for her and her children.

“We have to get to the heart of why we’re still walking, why we’re still showing up at small events like this. We’re here, we’re not leaving. We just want to raise our family in an environment that accepts them,” Lancaster said.

As supporters stood around a charred flag, their message to whoever is responsible is simple.

“God loves you and we forgive you, but we won’t be deterred from loving and affirming LGBTQ people,” Darnell said.

A member of the congregation donated a new flag to the church. Darnell said that would increase at some point.

The church later posted on Facebook that it had filed a police report.

Local News: Recent Coverage ⬇

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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Community leader reflects on failed weekend ceasefire in Columbus https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-leader-reflects-on-failed-weekend-ceasefire-in-columbus/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 07:02:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-leader-reflects-on-failed-weekend-ceasefire-in-columbus/ Over the weekend of June 16 of this year, barbershop owner Al Edmondson and other members of the Columbus community attempted to create a 24-hour ceasefire. COLUMBUS, Ohio – Over the weekend of June 16 this year, barber shop owner Al Edmondson and other members of the Columbus community attempted to create a 24-hour ceasefire […]]]>

Over the weekend of June 16 of this year, barbershop owner Al Edmondson and other members of the Columbus community attempted to create a 24-hour ceasefire.

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Over the weekend of June 16 this year, barber shop owner Al Edmondson and other members of the Columbus community attempted to create a 24-hour ceasefire in the town, urging people to lay down their guns and find love instead.

Spread across the wall of Edmondson’s Barber Shop is a mural of the Mount Vernon community from years past. He said it reminded him of the unity and peace that once reigned in the neighborhood.

The ceasefire ended shortly after it began around 12:30 p.m. Saturday when Columbus police said a person was found shot dead at Circle K on Schrock Road.

Hours later, around 4:30 a.m., police found two people with gunshot wounds in the western part of town. Both were taken to Grant Medical Center.

Just after 8:50 p.m. the same day, police said a person was shot on Fairwood Avenue.

“Maybe I should have posted more. Maybe I should have put more radio ads in there,” Edmondson said.

Edmondson said most of the shootings he hears about involve young people. He said more accountability was needed.

“Parents need to stop being friends with their children and really become parents. Tell those young men and women out there that ‘we love you’ and let them know there is another way to solve your problems,” he said.

Edmondson said he knew the end of gun violence would not be resolved overnight, but he would not abandon his community.

Edmondson said next year he will ensure there is a 24-hour ceasefire.

“We have a long way to go, and we need everyone on board,” Edmondson said.

Local News: Recent Coverage ⬇

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

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San Jose Community Briefings for the week of June 24 – The Mercury News https://sanshinzencommunity.org/san-jose-community-briefings-for-the-week-of-june-24-the-mercury-news/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 14:33:18 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/san-jose-community-briefings-for-the-week-of-june-24-the-mercury-news/ national evening The San Jose Police Department will host a National Night on Tuesday, August 2. National Night is a crime prevention event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch. The event is designed to strengthen neighborhood spirit and police/community partnerships; increase awareness of crime prevention; generate support and participation in local crime prevention […]]]>

national evening

The San Jose Police Department will host a National Night on Tuesday, August 2. National Night is a crime prevention event sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch. The event is designed to strengthen neighborhood spirit and police/community partnerships; increase awareness of crime prevention; generate support and participation in local crime prevention efforts; and build community connections.

Registration is open until July 17 for neighbors and organizations interested in hosting social events, block parties and community gatherings. Register on https://www.sjpd.org/community/crime-prevention/national-night-out. For more information, call the SJPD Crime Prevention Unit at 408-277-4133 to speak with staff from the National Evening Planning Team.

Summer meal program

Second Harvest of Silicon Valley is once again offering a summer lunch program so kids 18 and under can get a free, nutritious lunch at more than 80 locations in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties during the lockdown. ‘school.

To make it easier for local families to access free summer meals, Second Harvest recently launched a site locator on its website. Families can visit www.shfb.org/mealsforkids and enter their address, city or postal code. Icons appear on a map where summer meal sites are located, and users can click the icons to get details about location, meal times, and contact information.

For its program, Second Harvest partners with needy school districts, libraries, social service organizations, and other nonprofits that serve summer meals in both counties. To encourage participation, some sites have received grants that provide low-cost or no-cost meals to parents and caregivers so families can eat together.

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Community school advocates back more funding but demand fixes for program flaws https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-school-advocates-back-more-funding-but-demand-fixes-for-program-flaws/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 07:04:11 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-school-advocates-back-more-funding-but-demand-fixes-for-program-flaws/ Credit: Allison Shelley for American Education Credit: Allison Shelley for American Education Proponents of the community school movement want lawmakers to invest more in the seven-year state initiative to bring essential services to thousands of schools in low-income areas, but they say “flaws” in the program’s launch should be fixed in the next round of […]]]>
Credit: Allison Shelley for American Education

Proponents of the community school movement want lawmakers to invest more in the seven-year state initiative to bring essential services to thousands of schools in low-income areas, but they say “flaws” in the program’s launch should be fixed in the next round of funding.

United Ways of California, along with other community school advocates, said districts that are understaffed are struggling to meet the tight deadline for the first round of grants and may also struggle to meet the application deadline. fall for the next series. Advocates said some districts weren’t getting enough information and guidance on how to run community schools and qualifications may have been too rigid in the first round – disregarding the special circumstances of some rural districts .

Still, advocates fully support Governor Gavin Newsom’s proposal to add $1.5 billion from the Budget 2022-23 to extend the program. It was launched with $3 billion from the current year budget approved last year.

The Legislature’s 2022-23 budget proposal cut the program along with some of Newsom’s other proposals to add $4.5 billion to the local control funding formula.

“Community schools can be transformative,” United Ways of California President and CEO Pete Manzo said in an interview with EdSource. “We are totally in favor of the money in the proposed budget, but share a concern about how the program has been rolled out.” The association is the State Section of the National Poverty Advocacy Group.

The legislature passed a reserved budget Monday and will continue to to negotiate with Newsom on details before the start of the next fiscal year on July 1. Shadow budget did not include Newsom’s $1.5 billion proposal increase funding for community schools.

Malia Vella, deputy superintendent of public instruction, told EdSource that the state anticipated that some districts would not have been able to meet the application deadline for the first round of grants, and that is why the program offers two rounds of planning grants and three rounds of implementation grants. Planning grants total $200,000 over two years for district schools, charters and county offices of education to establish community school frameworks. Implementation grants are for existing community schools over five years and range from $712,500 to $2.375 million depending on the size of the school.

Districts and charter schools will be required to contribute an additional third as a match for state grants.

Kendra Fehrer, research director for the Community Schools Learning Exchange, an organization that helps schools implement community school programs, said many schools that would qualify for community school grants are overwhelmed this year and ” simply don’t have the bandwidth” to go through the application process – especially in a limited time frame. The request for planning grant applications was released on February 28 and was due April 1, and the request for implementation grant applications was released on March 10 and was due April 11.

“When there’s such a tight turnaround when schools are at very low capacity, which districts can take advantage of this program?” Fehrer said. “It’s the districts that have greater capacity, that have a grant writer, that have economies of scale that they can do this, or they have the resources.”

Fehrer said the California Department of Education should consider simplifying the application process for districts and be clearer about timelines. Fehrer urged the department to reach out to schools for feedback to better understand how equitable the rollout of the program has been.

Another California deputy superintendent of public instruction, Steve Zimmer, told the May 18 Meeting of the National Board of Education where the first round of grants was approved, that “urgency and compressed timing” were unavoidable for the first round. With more time to prepare for the next cycle, Zimmer said, the department plans to “actively listen” to stakeholders to learn how it can better engage districts that aren’t already “in the know” about community schools.

“We think we haven’t reached everyone, and we disagree with that,” Zimmer said.

Manzo, the CEO of United Way, in an April letter to members of the state Assembly, urged the state to delay sending out the request for applications for the next round of grants until that the department can obtain these comments.

Manzo also calls for the program to have a “more explicit connection” linking K-12 and early childhood education programs like transitional kindergarten and pre-kindergarten. The State Law which established the Community Schools Partnership Program requires the state to prioritize grant applicants who commit to providing early childhood care and education for children from birth to age 5 under their program.

“We want to see that early integration,” Manzo said. “Orientation alone is not enough. We want specific measures for early childhood education. What gets measured gets done.

Grant applicants who commit to adopting strategies to address childhood trauma are also prioritized in the process. Manzo is concerned, however, that the state has not given enough guidance on how to proceed.

Districts should also be required to partner with community organizations, Manzo said, and community organizations, like Centraide, should be able to apply as a lead organization – especially for districts that are too overburdened to apply for funding.

Because the grant program is funded by Proposition 98, only schools, districts and other local education agencies can receive the money, a State Board of Education spokesperson said. Allowing community organizations to be primary agencies would require a change in state law.

The $3 billion grant includes $166 million to fund a network of regional technical assistance centers. United Way of California and the Orange County Office of Education applied to be the lead agency, but the state board awarded the $20 million to the Alameda County Office of Education and at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Beware of rural communities

Julie Boesch, superintendent of the Maple Elementary School District in West Kern County, worried that the rigid qualification rules for the first round of grants were leaving out small, rural districts that are also working to expand their community service offerings.

In 2018, Maple joined with neighboring small rural districts to form the West Kern Consortium to receive funding from a federal community school grant program. Since then, the consortium has pooled resources and split costs to provide social services and mental health resources in schools, hire a shared math coach, and launch other programs that Boesch says have seen a surge. measurable success.

But the consortium now illustrates a problem that proponents say needs to be fixed. All six schools in the consortium applied for implementation grants, but Maple – the “anchor” of the consortium – was the only one denied. This is because only 55% of Maple’s 300 students were considered low income; the first round of grants was reserved for schools with 80% or more low-income students, or small rural schools with 70% or more low-income students.

The law establishing the Community Schools Program gives priority to schools that serve 80% or more low-income students. Judging by demand from schools that didn’t meet the criteria in the first round, Vella said it would be “very difficult to drop below the 80% prioritization threshold in future rounds” without the 1.5 billion. additional dollars proposed by Newsom.

The CDE encourages schools and districts that did not qualify for the first round of funding to apply for future rounds, Pete Callas, director of the Career and Academic Transition Division, said at the meeting of the May 18.

Because the consortium schools are pooling their resources, the state’s denial of Maple’s request for a total of nearly $1.2 million over five years impacts all six schools, Boesch said.

“It doesn’t just hurt my students, it hurts all the students in the consortium,” she said.

Boesch thinks the state should have looked at the “big picture” instead of looking at just one thing – especially after all the work that has been done to bring the community school model to the region over the years. of the last five years. She plans to apply for the next round of grants.

“The work will continue, but it will be impacted,” Boesch said.

For more reports like this, click here to sign up for EdSource’s free daily email about the latest developments in education.

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Clovis Community College named 2022-23 Military Spouse Friendly School | KAMR https://sanshinzencommunity.org/clovis-community-college-named-2022-23-military-spouse-friendly-school-kamr/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:10:15 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/clovis-community-college-named-2022-23-military-spouse-friendly-school-kamr/ CLOVIS, NM (KAMR/KCIT) – Clovis Community College officials recently announced that it has been recognized as a 2022-23 Military Spouse Friendly School. According to a college press release, this recognition began being given to colleges in 2009, giving military spouses the opportunity to seek out the best post-secondary education experiences for those who are military […]]]>

CLOVIS, NM (KAMR/KCIT) – Clovis Community College officials recently announced that it has been recognized as a 2022-23 Military Spouse Friendly School.

According to a college press release, this recognition began being given to colleges in 2009, giving military spouses the opportunity to seek out the best post-secondary education experiences for those who are military spouses.

Establishments that have achieved designation have been assessed using federal data sources as well as other survey information. Rating factors included academic credibility and support, career planning resources, flexibility, military family support, population percentages, and achievement.

“We are proud to receive the Military Spouse Friendly® School designation. Clovis Community College is proud to provide a caring campus and exceptional academic opportunities for military spouses who serve our country,” CCC President Charles Nwankwo said in the statement.

The college was also named a Silver Military Friendly school for the 2022-23 school year earlier this year.

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Rocky River Community Chorus celebrated spring with love songs https://sanshinzencommunity.org/rocky-river-community-chorus-celebrated-spring-with-love-songs/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:20:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/rocky-river-community-chorus-celebrated-spring-with-love-songs/ ROCKY RIVER, Ohio — The Rocky River Community Chorus performed their spring concert June 12 at the United Methodist Church on Detroit Road. They performed to enthusiastic audiences singing love songs from different eras, something for everyone. Songs ranged from Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein to Freddie Mercury. Included in their 14-song repertoire for the […]]]>

ROCKY RIVER, Ohio — The Rocky River Community Chorus performed their spring concert June 12 at the United Methodist Church on Detroit Road. They performed to enthusiastic audiences singing love songs from different eras, something for everyone. Songs ranged from Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein to Freddie Mercury.

Included in their 14-song repertoire for the concert were such songs as the 1940s “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree”, “Shenandoah”, a beloved American folk song, “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man from Showboat, “Somewhere” from West Side Story and ending with “God Bless America”.

The Choir started many years ago. The current group formed in 2013 with around 50 members and has grown since then, according to member Renee Kolesar. The Choir presents a spring concert and a holiday concert. The holiday concert is full of Christmas favourites.

Kolesar reflected on some of the band’s history. “Ron Muth was our first director. He was a music and choir teacher at Rocky River High School. While he was conducting, we played with his high school bands a few times or sometimes they played with us. When he left, Mike Mazur was our manager. He was a producer with the Singing Angels and Emily Ortolano was a pianist. When he left around 2006, Emily became our manager. After Emily we had Michelle Haras and now we have Ceste Stanly who is accompanied by Kristen Johnson.

The Rocky River Community Band will perform their own concert at 7 p.m. June 26 at Rocky River Park, located on the lake at 20250 Beachcliff Boulevard.

For more information on the Rocky River Community Band or Chorus or to become a member, visit https://www.rrcity.com/civic-organizations and click on Community Band and Community Chorus in the list of organizations.

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Live United: Validation of the movement in the right direction in the community – Albert Lea Tribune https://sanshinzencommunity.org/live-united-validation-of-the-movement-in-the-right-direction-in-the-community-albert-lea-tribune/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 15:28:37 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/live-united-validation-of-the-movement-in-the-right-direction-in-the-community-albert-lea-tribune/ Live United by Erin Haag Recently, I spent a few days in Madison, Wisconsin for a four-day United Way regional conference. This conference has been on my radar since I started, and it has a very good reputation. It’s hard for me, definitely out of my comfort zone. I’m not particularly introverted, but this huge […]]]>

Live United by Erin Haag

Recently, I spent a few days in Madison, Wisconsin for a four-day United Way regional conference. This conference has been on my radar since I started, and it has a very good reputation. It’s hard for me, definitely out of my comfort zone. I’m not particularly introverted, but this huge conference with over 300 United Way professionals from 12 states — I admit to having a few tears about it.

Erin Haag

Don’t get me wrong, there was excitement about it too. Over the past three years, I have connected with United Way professionals across the country, but rarely have I had the opportunity to meet them in person. The opportunity to network on a different level and really engage and hear about strategies to bring about real and lasting change? It was exciting for me too.

As difficult as it was, I knew that once there I would be fine, and I was. I was fine too. I didn’t sign up for all the fun sessions. I made sure to balance them with some of the financial sessions, the latest tax laws, and best practices in presenting budgets. But did I learn something shocking? Did I learn some really cool innovative ideas that will save the world? Or at least our little part of the world in the county of Freeborn? Not really.

Wow, wait. Not really? You left and spent four days and didn’t come back with a major idea? It sounds bad, but I promise you it wasn’t. Because a major idea would be to start from scratch, and that’s a long process. Slow. As. Molasses. My most important lesson from the conference was validation. Our team has been developing strategies in several areas over the past year — and I’ve found other United Ways developing these same strategies. How awesome is it to realize that the work your team worked on was a successful idea elsewhere? So instead of earth-shattering ideas, I was able to tweak the work we’re already doing and have the opportunity to tweak the approaches. One session I attended, I had research data and information spinning in my brain, I just wasn’t able to pull it all together to make a solid presentation to my target audience. Cue in a presentation with a former city manager turned United Way manager and it was like he took it all from my brain, sorted it and gave it back to me in a nice package.

I can almost hear my readers thinking, “What strategies are you talking about? Well, one of them is the Seniors United in Service Club development at the Senior Center. Since last November, each month, Nikolle, our Community Impact and Resource Coordinator, has offered a volunteer project that seniors can participate in. They are “kits” in a way. We bring the supplies, and the seniors work to put them together, and then we take them and distribute them. So far, we’ve created hygiene kits that have been shared with different schools, literacy kits for Read Across America that have been distributed to Head Start classrooms, homemade dog treats for the Freeborn County Humane Society and Children’s Library Seed Kits to Celebrate the Earth. Day.

It was so well received that we wanted to expand on that and take our show on the road. Does your company want to get involved in volunteering? We hope so, because studies show that companies with a strong culture of giving back are able to attract and retain employees. Nikolle has developed a list of kits for your service club, your team building event, your efforts to give back to the whole employee. Want to create mental health kits? Let us know your budget, we can come and settle in your rest room. Education, engagement and giving back all rolled into one. We take care of the supply list, ordering and distribution, ensuring that the necessary items are really needed in our community.

After all, this is where we hear people who want to give back in this way struggle the most. Lots of ideas, but they don’t know exactly what they really need. It’s a job of calling different places and figuring out what a listing would be, the specific brands, then arranging to drop them off, etc.

Here is an example. Many people dearly want to donate gloves to our Winter Gear Drive. So they buy gloves by the dozen, making their money grow by choosing the one-size-fits-all “magic glove.” What we’ve discovered though is that we really can’t use them. The social workers at the school begged us not to give them to the children. What we need for our cold Minnesota winter are waterproof gloves and mittens, designed for playing in the snow. (By the way, we still give out the gloves, we just make sure to give them waterproof gloves with them). Hygiene kits are another popular product, but I recently heard of a nonprofit that received so many hygiene kits that they no longer wanted them. Seems like several bands had the same idea at once. Nobody wants to say “no, we don’t need it”, because then they might seem ungrateful. Many nonprofits are terrified of alienating potential donors, volunteers they are afraid to say no to.

I was thrilled to learn that a United Way was working with American Family Insurance to create mental health kits. I attended a “wrapping event”, so I could view the items, see the event unfold, and replicate it. Nikolle was glad I brought her home a sanity kit, minus the smiley face stress ball my son absolutely had to have.

Would you like to be one of the first to sign up for this? Call me at 507-373-8670, and we’d love to go through the process. Until then, stay tuned for more ways to live together. There are many more events that we need to share!

Erin Haag is the Executive Director of United Way of Freeborn County.

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Community investment fund accepting applications; 875 million dollars ready to be cashed https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-investment-fund-accepting-applications-875-million-dollars-ready-to-be-cashed/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 23:06:39 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-investment-fund-accepting-applications-875-million-dollars-ready-to-be-cashed/ HARTFORD, Conn. (WTNH) – Over the next five years, a massive infusion of state money will be scattered throughout Connecticut. It’s called the 2030 Community Investment Fund: a five-year state grant program backed by $875 million in funding. A huge injection of taxpayers’ money will revive the fund. Leaders hope this will bring an equitable […]]]>

HARTFORD, Conn. (WTNH) – Over the next five years, a massive infusion of state money will be scattered throughout Connecticut.

It’s called the 2030 Community Investment Fund: a five-year state grant program backed by $875 million in funding.

A huge injection of taxpayers’ money will revive the fund. Leaders hope this will bring an equitable change to the landscape of the state.

“There are so many needs in our communities. It’s a matter of fairness,” said State Rep. Bobby Gibson, vice chairman of the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus.

Each year for the next five years, the CIF Board of Directors will award $175 million. The money will be targeted to help underserved communities like Hartford.

State Senator Doug McCrory, who represents Hartford, issued the challenge to the universe.

“Show us something that will transform your community, because that’s what you need. This is what we need. It’s what all of our neighborhoods need,” McCrory said.

Who can apply? There are 54 towns or cities considered underserved. New Haven and Waterbury fall into the category. Towns like Wethersfield and Enfield can also apply.

They are considered public investment communities.

House Speaker Matt Ritter said Homestead Avenue in North Hartford is an example of space this fund could benefit from.

“They’ve had these old warehouses for many years that we have to tear down and put back upright. But first you have to clean the floor,” Ritter said.

News 8’s Jodi Latina asked, “More focused on programs like this rather than a revamp of the XL Center?”

“I mean, XL Center would come out of a different pot of money. For me, it’s a regional asset and a regional attraction,” Ritter said.

Community development corporations and non-profit organizations that serve one or more of the designated cities may also apply. The money can be used for the following:

  • Clean up an industrial wasteland
  • affordable housing
  • Water and sewer infrastructure improvements
  • Pedestrian safety and traffic calming improvements
  • Energy resilience or clean energy projects
  • Land acquisitions and capital projects for the construction of libraries and centers for the elderly.

The Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) manages the program. The CIF Board of Directors and the Office of the Governor review the nominations and then recommend the winners.

The Government Bonds Commission approves grant proposals. Projects that hire locals, raise outside funds and use project working agreements will be given priority.

“It’s a big effort with a lot of power behind it and a really ambitious goal,” said Alexandra Daum, Deputy Commissioner of the Ministry of Economic and Community Development.

Small businesses will also be able to get money for microloans and gap financing. The deadline to apply for the first round of funding is July 25.

Projects will receive money in October.

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The Town of Hingham welcomes Aileen Walsh as a full-time Community Crisis Response Clinician https://sanshinzencommunity.org/the-town-of-hingham-welcomes-aileen-walsh-as-a-full-time-community-crisis-response-clinician/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 15:56:34 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/the-town-of-hingham-welcomes-aileen-walsh-as-a-full-time-community-crisis-response-clinician/ Ailen Walsh took on the role of Community Crisis Response Clinician for the Hingham Police Department late last month (photo courtesy of the Hingham Police Department) June 7, 2022 Submitted by Hingham Police Department Town Administrator Tom Mayo and Chief Constable David Jones are pleased to announce the hiring of Hingham Police Department’s new full-time […]]]>

Ailen Walsh took on the role of Community Crisis Response Clinician for the Hingham Police Department late last month (photo courtesy of the Hingham Police Department)

June 7, 2022 Submitted by Hingham Police Department

Town Administrator Tom Mayo and Chief Constable David Jones are pleased to announce the hiring of Hingham Police Department’s new full-time Community Crisis Response Clinician.

Aileen Walsh assumed the role on Monday, May 23. From 2018 to 2020, she worked as a prison diversion clinician in a joint position with Hingham and Weymouth Police Services, where she served as a co-worker providing mental health and addictions crisis intervention. abusive calls.

Previously, Walsh served as a Diversion Clinician for the Newton Police Department and as a Crisis Clinician and Substance Abuse Counselor in the Greater Boston Area and throughout the South Shore. Most recently, she served as Program Director for the Aspire Health Alliance’s Integrated Crisis Team, directly supervising approximately 10 staff members.

In her new role, which is fully funded by the City, she will provide similar resources not only to people with mental health and addictions needs, but also to their family members. She will respond to calls with members of Hingham Police and will also follow up with hospitals for further assessment to get people the help and support they need. She is also available to train agents on the proper ways to respond to mental health-related calls.

“There has never been a greater need for these types of services, and Aileen’s previous experience with Hingham Police made her a perfect fit for this new full-time position,” Chief Jones said. . “She has many connections in the mental health field and years of valuable experience, and will be a vital member of our department. His integration within the department and his ability to respond directly to agents make this position unique, and we know that it will be very beneficial for the whole community.

Walsh said her ability to help residents directly with court-related issues when needed is another part of her job, allowing her to help people navigate a complicated system.

“There are many layers to this role, and one of the things that makes it work is how open Hingham Police are to developing new programs and finding creative ways to help residents in need.” , Walsh said. “The community has also been on board and so supportive of me and my role. I want to do everything I can to do well with them.

Walsh will also do outreach at Hingham Public Schools, working to educate students and staff about issues related to mental health and substance use disorders.

“I am thrilled to be here as I continue to build relationships and help Hingham residents and Hingham Police Department support officers,” Walsh said. “The volume of mental health-related calls continues to increase dramatically, and that means a lot of work in a community that not only recognizes this, but is also working aggressively to address it.”

Walsh earned a Bachelor of Arts in Irish and Geography from University College Galway, Ireland, and a Master of Arts in Mental Health Counseling from Lesley University.

Anyone who would like to contact Walsh or find out more about the services she provides can contact her at 781-749-1212 ext. 2222, or walsha@hpd.org.

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Streator Community Remembers Jimmie Lansford – Shaw Local https://sanshinzencommunity.org/streator-community-remembers-jimmie-lansford-shaw-local/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 23:13:57 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/streator-community-remembers-jimmie-lansford-shaw-local/ Former Streator town manager Scot Wrighton said former mayor Jimmie Lansford changed Streator’s course for the good. “He made it a better place,” Wrighton said. Wrighton was one of seven speakers on Saturday to share stories of Lansford at a public memorial service at the Plumb Pavilion in City Park which was attended by around […]]]>

Former Streator town manager Scot Wrighton said former mayor Jimmie Lansford changed Streator’s course for the good.

“He made it a better place,” Wrighton said.

Wrighton was one of seven speakers on Saturday to share stories of Lansford at a public memorial service at the Plumb Pavilion in City Park which was attended by around 125 to 150 people. Speakers focused on family, faith, education, military service, and government, each considered an important aspect of Lansford’s life.

Lansford died on January 15 at the age of 82, shortly after stepping down as mayor of Streator on December 31. He was mayor for 11 years and a member of the city council before that.

Due to pandemic precautions, community members did not have the opportunity to share their memories of Lansford at a public event until Saturday.

Wrighton listed an example of the projects Lansford had handed over, including the renovation of City Hall; the expansion of Vactor Manufacturing, the city’s largest employer; and downtown improvements. Wrighton said there are many other examples.

“He had a vision,” Wrighton said. “He could see what others couldn’t see. He would make a decision now that will help Streator in his future.

Wrighton said Lansford stood for what was right. He said that although Lansford served on the board of the Hospital Sisters Health System, which operated St. Mary’s before it closed, he encouraged OSF HealthCare to improve its original plans when it took over from HSHS. to include an emergency room and use the existing hospital. building.

Lansford’s time as a city councilman and mayor was one aspect of his life, but family came first, each speaker said.

David Lansford speaks about his father Jimmie during a public memorial for the former Mayor of Streator on Saturday June 4, 2022, at the Plumb Pavilion in Streator Town Park.

His son, David, said his father attended Notre Dame University for his master’s degree, but always commuted to make sure he could spend time with his family. David said his father also arranged time for him to visit one of the college dorms, creating a shared love for Our Lady between the two of them.

Saturday’s memorial service concluded with “Victory March,” Notre Dame’s battle song.

Jack Dzuris, retired director of the Streator Area Chamber of Commerce and friend of Jimmie Lansford, speaks at the former mayor's memorial on Saturday June 4, 2022, at the Plumb Pavilion in City Park.

Jack Dzuris, retired executive director of the Streator Area Chamber of Commerce and friend of Lansford, opened Saturday’s memorial by reminding those present to take life slower and listen to the music before it is over, noting that Lansford did so by prioritizing family moments.

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Jerry Corcoran, president of Illinois Valley Community College, said Lansford earned 85 college credit hours from Oglesby Community College and continues to support him. Lansford delivered the 2016 commencement address and was elected to the CCSVI Hall of Fame.

Prior to his more than 40-year professional career in healthcare administration and banking, Lansford served in the United States Marine Corps and Army, including as a physician in Vietnam. He never stopped serving, his friend Doug Patterson said, as Lansford joined the VFW, American Legion and AmVets.

Reverend Caleb Suydam of Park Presbyterian Church gave the blessing and shared a story about Lansford and his wife Gigi as he gave them a tour of Streator, with Jimmie providing historical footnotes and excitement.

Lansford’s grandchildren led the Pledge of Allegiance and a color guard presented the flags.

The memorial served as a reminder that Lansford was more than a mayor. He was a father, grandfather, friend, veteran and civil servant.

Reverend Caleb Suydam of Park Presbyterian Church led prayers on Saturday, June 4, 2022, at a public memorial for Jimmie Lansford at the Plumb Pavilion in Streator City Park.
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