Community – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:41:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Community – Sanshin Zen Community http://sanshinzencommunity.org/ 32 32 Community concerned about crime along ML King Drive in Atlanta https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-concerned-about-crime-along-ml-king-drive-in-atlanta/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:41:27 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-concerned-about-crime-along-ml-king-drive-in-atlanta/ Business owners along Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. concerned about violence Crime is down on this side of town from this time last year. That’s according to Atlanta police who came out Monday night to speak to residents. A community member says the data is all relative when you witness the violence every day. […]]]>

Some community members and business owners along the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Drive corridor say violent crime is spiraling out of control, especially among young people. Last month alone, a shooting involving an officer left one dead, another sent a KFC employee in hospitaland likeyelling at a Chick-fil-A cost your life of a 24-year-old man.

“We don’t want to see a child killed, a possible chef, a possible scientist, a possible super dad left on the street. I saw it… I was just passing by,” said Shadé Jones, a resident, about the shooting outside the Chick-fil-A.

That’s on top of five car break-ins, three aggravated assaults, three robberies and one burglary, according to the APD’s Area 1 commander, all of which have been reported in the past 28 days.

“It’s very disheartening…we have to work together to uplift the young people in our neighborhoods,” said Jones, president of the NPUL of English Ave and Vine City.

While police say crime in the hallway is down 28% from the same time last year, MLK Ashby Merchant Association President Johnny Mims says the same is true for business at a time when they generally see things pick up again and that’s even with normal patrols.

“They sent in bike cops and foot cops. We also understand that they don’t have the resources to be on this street 24 hours a day,” Mims said.

He says the MLK-Ashby Merchant Association hopes to raise funds that would pay for off-duty cops when on-duty police aren’t around. Mims called on big companies like Walmart, Chick-fil-A and nearby universities to participate.

“It’s $342,000 and these small businesses can’t afford to do it themselves,” he explained.

District 3 Councilman Byron Amos says he is working with Georgia Power to solve another part of the problem: lighting.

“When you have a dark street, you have those who start praying on it and those who are in the dark,” Amos explained.

He says Georgia Power is working to determine which lights need to be repaired or replaced. Councilor Amos says he should hear from Georgia Power about lighting upgrades in the area by the end of this week.

The MLK-Ashby Merchant Association is asking business owners to post “Stop the Violence” signs in their windows as a show of solidarity. Atlanta Police also encouraged business owners and residents to register with Connect Atlanta, a public safety program that gives police access to external home cameras.

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The Mercer County Community College Jazz Ensemble travels to Mercer-area hotspots to spread the jazzy sounds of the season https://sanshinzencommunity.org/the-mercer-county-community-college-jazz-ensemble-travels-to-mercer-area-hotspots-to-spread-the-jazzy-sounds-of-the-season/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:36:43 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/the-mercer-county-community-college-jazz-ensemble-travels-to-mercer-area-hotspots-to-spread-the-jazzy-sounds-of-the-season/ West Windsor, New Jersey – Get into the holiday spirit and watch the Mercer County Community College (MCCC) Jazz Band play the sounds of the season. Free entry! Led by Scott Hornick, the MCCC Jazz Band – comprised of thirteen MCCC students, faculty and special guests – will present varied and exciting performances throughout the […]]]>

West Windsor, New Jersey – Get into the holiday spirit and watch the Mercer County Community College (MCCC) Jazz Band play the sounds of the season. Free entry!

Led by Scott Hornick, the MCCC Jazz Band – comprised of thirteen MCCC students, faculty and special guests – will present varied and exciting performances throughout the holiday season. The repertoire includes works by Wayne Shorter, Erroll Garner, George and Ira Gershwin, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Stevie Wonder, Kurt Weill, Ringo Sheena and others. All selections feature exceptional improvisations by jazz students from Mercer County Community College.

See the MCCC Jazz Band live on the following dates. Free entry!
Friday, November 18 at 6:30 p.m.

Quakerbridge Mall (outside the Cheesecake Factory entrance at 3320 US-1 in Lawrenceville) for the tree lighting and Santa’s arrival.

Wednesday, November 30 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m..
Princeton MarketFair at 3535 US-1.

Wednesday, December 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Inside the Quakerbridge Mall at 3320 US-1 in Lawrenceville.

Wednesday, December 14 at 7:30 p.m.
Last fall performance at the Kelsey Theater on the campus of Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. This event will also be broadcast live.

More MCCC Music Coming to Kelsey Theater During December

On December 13 at 7:30 p.m., MCCC faculty, in conjunction with the MCCC Music Club, will perform at the Kelsey Theater as part of a fundraiser for scholarships for music students. The event will be streamed live and donations will be accepted in person and online.

Free on December 21 at 7:30 p.m. is the MCCC Symphonic Band, led by Dr. Lou Woodruff. This performance will close the concert series at the Kelsey Theater of the MCCC. The 45-member ensemble will feature classics from Vivaldi, Sousa and Strauss, a variety of pop and seasonal favorites. A traditional holiday song will also be orchestrated! One must reserve.

For more information on these Mercer County Community College events and more, visit https://kelsey.mccc.edu/events. For live stream information, visit kelsey.mccc.edu near the event date.

For more details on MCCC Jazz Band membership and music lessons at MCCC, visit this link.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Music Programs at MCCC

Current news

CCMC home page

The Mercer County Community College Jazz Band, led by Scott Hornick, performed their first holiday concert of the season Nov. 16 at the MarketFair on Route 1 in Princeton. It was the groupit is first gig at MarketFair since 2019. The band performed a variety of jazz standards and traditional holiday favorites. Other free concerts are scheduled in the region in November and December. This yearThe set includes Very Thompson and Matt Gargiullo on vibraphone, Jalen Johnson on trombone, Alina Mastrangeli on clarinet, Kayla Hawkins on flute, David Meriney on drums, Harrison Silverman on ukulele, Kyrie miller on guitar, Eddie Berkeyheiser on keyboard , CiCi Corriveau on keyboard, Maho Kurisu on vocals and keyboard and Camryn LeCain, Ave Corbitt, Isabel Pluchino and Harrison Silverman on vocals. (Photo credit: Marcy Roberts)

JazzBand22022

The Jazz Band introduced Matt Gargiullo on vibraphone. (Photo credit: Marcy Roberts)

2022JazzBandSingers

Singing holiday songs left to right: Maho Kurisu, Ave Corbitt, Isabel Pluchino, Harrison Silverman. Back row at Kyrie Miller guitar. (Photo credit: Marcy Roberts)

JazzGuitarPiano

The Mercer County Community College Jazz Band also featured Very Thompson on vibraphone for several numbers. (Photo credit: Marcy Roberts)

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The MCCC Jazz Band’s horn section included Jalen Johnson on trombone, Alina Mastrangeli on clarinet, Kayla Hawkins on flute, and David Meriney on backstage on drums. (Photo credit: Marcy Roberts)

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GWPD steps up community outreach with campus events – The GW Hatchet https://sanshinzencommunity.org/gwpd-steps-up-community-outreach-with-campus-events-the-gw-hatchet/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 08:24:43 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/gwpd-steps-up-community-outreach-with-campus-events-the-gw-hatchet/ The GW Police Department introduced a pair of signature events this fall to bolster student outreach efforts as part of GWPD Chief James Tate’s efforts to establish a community policing culture in Foggy Bottom. GWPD spear the school year in September with Raise High with GWPD, an event at University Yard where officers handed out […]]]>

The GW Police Department introduced a pair of signature events this fall to bolster student outreach efforts as part of GWPD Chief James Tate’s efforts to establish a community policing culture in Foggy Bottom.

GWPD spear the school year in September with Raise High with GWPD, an event at University Yard where officers handed out student food like free Chick-fil-A and brochures about the department, before unveiling Coffee with the chef, where students can discuss campus issues each month one-on-one with Tate via Webex. More than 10 students said the department’s high community engagement efforts signaled increased transparency from the department, drawing marked differences from a period of limited trust between GWPD and students prior to Tate. come to the department in 2020.

“The way to determine if outreach efforts are effective is to listen to students,” Tate said in an email. “We need to connect with students and listen to their feedback. So far, the feedback we have received has been positive. The students shared that what we are doing is “refreshing” and “new”. »

Tate said community outreach has been a “priority” for the department to reform the image of GWPD on campus since he assumed management at the start of 2020 of a department whose management had previously hanged in question among fracture student relations. Four months after joining GW, Tate called that of the department “woefully inadequate” officer training with minimal de-escalation preparation for officers.

BSU published a letter in June 2020 with eight other student organizations to pressure GWPD to rebuild trust with the GW community through non-tolerance policies for instances of racial bias and a weaker presence on campus in light of a raise critical against the police following the Black Lives Matter protests. The letter also arrived months after GWPD put an off-duty officer who seemed to push a student descending a series of steps during a protest for climate justice.

Tate said officers listened to students through discussion opportunities and events as part of their outreach. He said more students engaged in GWPD events and approached the department to file incident reports than in previous years – an “encouraging” sign of comfort and familiarity with the department.

Tate said the department organized Raise High with GWPD for the first time this year in September so community members can converse with officers in a “non-police capacity,” and he plans to make the event annual at Mount Vernon and Foggy campuses. Bottom. BSU and Fraternity and Sorority Life collaborated with GWPD to organize the event, and Tate said the department plans to collaborate with “various campus departments” and District Connections for future outreach events.

“During our community outreach event on U-Yard, student leaders from FSL and BSU volunteered to work alongside our officers at each station, greeting the community and helping to build camaraderie, especially with freshmen,” Tate said. “I have worked in several institutions and I have never seen anything like it.”

GWPD has also introduced Coffee with the Chief this school year, which takes place on the third Thursday of every month where Tate meets with students who can register a week in advance for 15-minute chat blocks over a two-day window. hours. Students can discuss public safety issues and potential community-building events and partnerships, depending on the University’s curriculum. website.

Students said GWPD’s newly introduced campus outreach events helped familiarize and build trust between Tate, officers and the GW community. Some said the department could continue to strengthen its publicity efforts by focusing on ongoing safety initiatives with more emails and press releases to announce department updates, including those regarding events on the campus.

Gianna Cook an English major and president of BSU, who was also a member of the administration that sent the letter condemning GWPD in 2020 said GWPD has “evolved” significantly over the past two years. She said that before Tate came to campus, GWPD was not helpful to community members due to their lack of familiarity with students, but now she said officers are doing their best. to welcome students, attend organization events, and provide opportunities for students to speak with them about politics.

“He requires his officers to engage with students on a personal level because he cares about our general well-being in addition to our safety,” Cook said.

Cook said that while BSU and GWPD don’t currently have any plans for an event in the near future, she wants the partnership between the groups to be “ongoing” because BSU represents underrepresented minority groups. She said the partnership is “very beneficial” and helps black students feel more comfortable with GWPD’s presence on campus.

“I think it helps with the representation aspect of knowing that our voices matter,” Cook said. “Hopefully in the next two months and even years after that, this partnership is still the mindset instead of the us versus them mindset that it might have been in the past.”

Michael Graham-Green, a senior political science major, attended Raise High with GWPD at U-Yard last month and said the event demonstrated a willingness from officers to connect with students.

“It’s definitely better than no outreach at all,” Graham-Green said. “I don’t know if it really made me more likely to interact with GWPD in the future, but it was better than just locking them in that building over there and not having any interaction.”

Graham-Green said the event made him more “comfortable” approaching GWPD officers.

“That was probably the best way they could have gone about it to be honest with you,” Graham-Green said. “I don’t know if it will necessarily make a lasting difference, but I think it’s the best way to do it.”

Dinorah Martell, an international business graduate, said GWPD could promote lesser-known events initiatives like its security app more effectively through increased publicity to better educate the GW community on their resources. She said the continued promotion of the GW Guardian applicationwhich allows students to be notified if their friends do not arrive home on time, could contribute to awareness-raising efforts.

“GW can do more to release these kind of apps instead of GWPD because I hear more from GW than from GWPD,” she said.

Lauren Beauvais, an indecisive freshman, said the outreach events helped students understand GWPD’s role on campus.

“I think it gives people a better understanding of what they’re doing, a better understanding of the process and their work,” she said.

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SF Community Ambassador Program Expands to West Portal https://sanshinzencommunity.org/sf-community-ambassador-program-expands-to-west-portal/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 06:21:11 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/sf-community-ambassador-program-expands-to-west-portal/ (KRON) – The holiday shopping season has arrived. San Francisco city leaders are working to increase public safety by expanding the Community Ambassador program to the West Portal neighborhood. “Some of you will recall that we made an announcement about increasing the number of ambassadors,” the Mayor of London Breed said. “The Ambassador Program has […]]]>

(KRON) – The holiday shopping season has arrived. San Francisco city leaders are working to increase public safety by expanding the Community Ambassador program to the West Portal neighborhood.

“Some of you will recall that we made an announcement about increasing the number of ambassadors,” the Mayor of London Breed said. “The Ambassador Program has been extremely successful. We not only have people who work with Urban Alchemy or Downtown Ambassadors, but we also have retired police officers – a program I started a few years ago.

Retired San Francisco Police Sergeant Kelly Kruger, after 20 years on the force, is one such ex-cop who now serves in the ranks of Community Ambassadors.

“I was a psychiatric nurse before being a police officer. So in about four years, I had to do what’s called psychiatric liaison. It helps people who have been placed in involuntary psychiatric detention,” Kruger said.

Some people who work and shop at West Portal say they welcome the added security.

KRON ON is broadcasting live news now

“I can speak personally as a young woman who is in a store alone or with one or two other women, late at night, there is little I feel capable of doing to keep the store safe,” said Lillian Van Cleve. , manager of West Portal Book Store.

City of San Francisco officials said the Community Ambassadors will debut at West Portal over the Thanksgiving holiday.

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Community members appear with Bill T. Jones https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-members-appear-with-bill-t-jones/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-members-appear-with-bill-t-jones/ By Don Fowler FirstWorks adds another bee to its hood with last week’s performance of new Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company work, “What Problem?” in front of a near-capacity audience among veterinarians. FirstWorks partnered with Brown Arts to present this moving production which involved 20 community members in modern dance. Hundreds of young school children […]]]>

By Don Fowler

FirstWorks adds another bee to its hood with last week’s performance of new Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company work, “What Problem?” in front of a near-capacity audience among veterinarians.

FirstWorks partnered with Brown Arts to present this moving production which involved 20 community members in modern dance.

Hundreds of young school children occupied the seats on the balcony and the second balcony, while we, the older ones, occupied the lower level. (Kids had the main seats to see the dance moves.)

Jones narrated the play, which explored her own journey and that of the character Pip in “Moby Dick”, covering issues of loneliness, isolation and community.

The loudest applause came from the top seats, and maybe there was a young black boy watching and thinking, “oh, I’d love to do that” and another Bill T. Jones will emerge.

Jones led a discussion on the article after its powerful conclusion.

Montreal Ice Dance Company

Le Patin Libre, (French for Free Skate, Montreal’s innovative ice dance company, will perform “Carte Blanche” at the Providence ice rink in Place Kennedy on December 1st at 6 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. as part of the community action FirstWorks Admission is free.

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Opening of a community garden as a habitat for Columbia’s pollinators https://sanshinzencommunity.org/opening-of-a-community-garden-as-a-habitat-for-columbias-pollinators/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 00:44:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/opening-of-a-community-garden-as-a-habitat-for-columbias-pollinators/ COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) – A pollinator garden near downtown Columbia celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting at 2513 Gervais Street on Saturday. “Columbia Green usually gives money to other groups to do these kinds of projects. And we decided we wanted to try making one ourselves. And this was the result,” said Trace […]]]>

COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) – A pollinator garden near downtown Columbia celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting at 2513 Gervais Street on Saturday.

“Columbia Green usually gives money to other groups to do these kinds of projects. And we decided we wanted to try making one ourselves. And this was the result,” said Trace Ballou, president of the Columbia Green 501(c)(3) nonprofit.

Ballou tells WIS that the pollinator garden was conceptualized two years ago and cost $11,000 to install in the Marvin Heller Community Garden. The grounds include a circular walkway surrounded by five informative plaques and six above-ground flowerbeds.

The project was made possible through a series of grants and a working partnership with the Lyon Street District Association (LSNA).

“It will be a place for pollinators to grow and it will help our community garden…thrive even more. It’s important projects like these that make our communities places we all want to live and be,” LSNA President Chase Toler said during Saturday’s celebration.

During the construction phase in 2021, Lyon Street neighbor Alvin “Rambo” Lemon planted a series of fruits and vegetables in the wheelchair-accessible garden bed.

“It’s rich soil here and it grows very well. I like to see things grow. Even if I don’t eat it, I love watching it grow,” said Lemon, a Korean War veteran who rode his mobility scooter at the celebration.

The LSNA also thanks the Central Carolina Realtors Association, the City of Columbia Parks and Recreation, and the Central Carolina Community Foundation for funding and other assistance.

The pollinator garden is open to the public and is not limited to the rue Lyon district.

“This garden is a true example of the kinds of collaborations Columbia Green wants to do more of. All groups are strengthened by working together to get things done for the good of the whole community,” Ballou said.

Columbia Green has operated throughout the capital since 1983. Its mission is to enhance and protect South Carolina’s natural beauty while educating the public about the environment. The non-profit organization hosts the annual Garden Festival and spearheads the Columbia Green Square Mile Project.

Columbia Green relies on community members to support its environmental operations. If you wish to join their efforts, Ballou invites you to Click here.

Notice a spelling or grammatical error in this article? Click or tap here to report it. Please include the title of the article.

Stay up to date with WIS News 10. Download the app from the Apple App Store Where Google Play Store and stream us on Roku, YouTube, Amazon Fire or Apple TV.

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$58 million approved for Community Schools Support System https://sanshinzencommunity.org/58-million-approved-for-community-schools-support-system/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 00:33:33 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/58-million-approved-for-community-schools-support-system/ California Department of EducationPress release California Department of EducationPress release Exit: #22-53November 2, 2022 SACRAMENTO––The California State Board of Education (SBE) today approved $58 million in contracts to build a support network for community schools, campuses where every classroom is focused on high-quality teaching and learning , every student is connected to the services […]]]>

California Department of Education
Press release

California Department of Education
Press release


Exit: #22-53
November 2, 2022

SACRAMENTO––The California State Board of Education (SBE) today approved $58 million in contracts to build a support network for community schools, campuses where every classroom is focused on high-quality teaching and learning , every student is connected to the services they need to thrive, and every family is empowered to participate in decision-making.

The $4 billion California Community Schools Partnership Program (CCSPP) is the nation’s largest investment in the success of high-needs students through a whole-child approach. Community schools partner with educational, county and non-profit entities to provide integrated health, mental health and social services, as well as high-quality supportive education, with a strong emphasis on community, family and student engagement.

Research shows that community schools can lead to better school attendance, better grades and test scores, higher enrollment in college preparatory classes, and higher graduation rates.

“Today’s vote approving Regional Technical Assistance Centers (RTACs) is another vital investment in California’s initiative to create the best community schools program in the nation,” said the superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond. “These RTACs will work on the ground with local education agencies and school sites to provide essential guidance. Now is the time for us to redouble our efforts to transform public education through the implementation of CCSPP. »

Community schools are a key initiative in California’s historic public school transformation that includes universal free school meals; transitional universal kindergarten; before and after school learning; and investments in teacher training, mentoring, recruitment and retention.

At a June event with educators, Governor Gavin Newsom called the support provided by community schools “essential to helping our children succeed.” Community schools provide these resources to local communities to strengthen support services. This strategy is the nation’s most ambitious proposal to improve student learning, health and well-being – full-service schools centered on the lived realities of students and families that provide everything students need. to help them thrive in the classroom.

SBE today approved contracts with eight county education offices (Shasta, Sacramento, Santa Clara, Monterey, Fresno, Los Angeles, San Diego, and San Bernardino) that will serve as RTACs in eight regions:

  • Northern California (Butte, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Trinity)
  • Capitol Area (Alpine, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Sierra, Solano, Sutter, Yolo, and Yuba)
  • Bay Area (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara and Sonoma)
  • Central Coast (Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz and Ventura)
  • Central Valley (Amador, Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus, Tulare and Tuolumne)
  • Greater Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
  • South Coast (Imperial, Orange and San Diego)
  • Southern Interior (Inyo, Mono, Riverside and San Bernardino)

RTACs will work closely with the State Transformational Assistance Center (Alameda County Office of Education in partnership with the UCLA Center for Community Schooling, Californians for Justice, and the National Education Association) to help emerging and existing community schools create networks of support with similar campuses, share best practices, plan for success, raise funds and coordinate services.

The California Department of Education (CDE) will be instrumental in overseeing RTAC contracts and working with counties to ensure fidelity to the vision of community schools shared by the collective California education community.

“I am grateful to the CDE, our county offices of education, districts and schools for stepping up this important work to support students, families and educators,” said SBE Chair Linda Darling. -Hammond. “Every school should be a joyful, healthy, and educational learning environment for children. The Council’s action today brings California one step closer to achieving schools that enable all students to s flourish and succeed.

The contracts awarded today build on SBE action in May to approve $649 million in grants to 268 school districts, county offices of education and charter schools to help plan new community schools and support existing initiatives. Additional planning and implementation grants will be awarded in the 2022-2023 school year, and implementation grants will be awarded in subsequent school years.

In January, the SBE approved a California Community Schools Framework that added four commitments to center the initiative on equity: a commitment to sharing power, using racially just restorative practices, teaching practices culturally relevant and to approach school communities through the positive lens of assessing strengths rather than focusing on challenges.

Governor Newsom Blueprint for Children’s Mental Health
External link opens in a new window or tab.
further highlights the critical importance of multi-sectoral collaboration to support the mental health and well-being of young people. The blueprint includes the $4.7 billion investment in the Child and Youth Behavioral Health Initiative and strengthens critical ties to community schools, Medi-Cal reforms under CalAIM, and the development of Workforce.

During Wednesday’s SBE presentation, California Secretary of Health and Human Services Dr. Mark Ghaly explained the urgent need to address the health and wellness needs of students in low-income neighborhoods and communities. income with limited access to doctors and clinics.

Community schools have been around for years, but CCSSP is the first statewide initiative in California to provide funding, support, and curriculum standardization through common guiding pillars: integrated services, including trauma-informed health services; expanded learning time and opportunities; collaborative leadership and practices for educators and administrators to support school climate; and engage students, families and the community.

# # # #

Tony Thurmond – State Superintendent of Public Instruction
Communications Division, Room 5602, 916-319-0818, Fax 916-319-0100

Last revised: Wednesday, November 2, 2022

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Community Tips for Halloween Safety | WJHL https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-tips-for-halloween-safety-wjhl/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:29:18 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/community-tips-for-halloween-safety-wjhl/ JONESBOROUGH, Tenn. (WJHL) – Trick or treat night is fast approaching and News Channel 11 has spoken with the Jonesborough community about safety tips to remember for Halloween. “Know the neighborhoods know the areas where you are tricking or dealing.” You don’t go somewhere you don’t know because you know you never know the people,” […]]]>

JONESBOROUGH, Tenn. (WJHL) – Trick or treat night is fast approaching and News Channel 11 has spoken with the Jonesborough community about safety tips to remember for Halloween.

“Know the neighborhoods know the areas where you are tricking or dealing.” You don’t go somewhere you don’t know because you know you never know the people,” Jonesborough Police Department officer Derrick Malone said.

Below are tips from officials and the community for Halloween safety.

  • Trick or treat with an adult. You can also cheat or deal with an older teenager. Adults should make sure to keep children in their line of sight at all times.
  • Wear bright colors or reflective clothing. This will help inform vehicles of where you are while touring or processing in the dark.
  • Stay safe when crossing the road. If your costume includes a mask, make sure it doesn’t cover your entire face so you can see where you’re going.
  • Candy or a spell in familiar areas. This way you know your surroundings and the people who live there.
  • Beware of people you don’t know. Don’t drive or ride in the car of someone you don’t know.
  • It’s best to wait until you get home to eat your sweets. It’s so you don’t get sick before you go home.
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First Lutheran Church to Host New Community Mental Health Resource Fair – Brainerd Dispatch https://sanshinzencommunity.org/first-lutheran-church-to-host-new-community-mental-health-resource-fair-brainerd-dispatch/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/first-lutheran-church-to-host-new-community-mental-health-resource-fair-brainerd-dispatch/ BRAINERD – Help is there for those with mental health and mental illness issues. The First Lutheran Church will host the first Community Mental Health Resource Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, October 29 at 424 S. Eighth St. in downtown Brainerd. “It will be a great opportunity for people to come […]]]>

BRAINERD – Help is there for those with mental health and mental illness issues.

The First Lutheran Church will host the first Community Mental Health Resource Fair from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, October 29 at 424 S. Eighth St. in downtown Brainerd.

“It will be a great opportunity for people to come out for free and learn more about these programs, locally,” said Karen Johnson, community health specialist for Crow Wing Energized, which is sponsoring the event.

Participants can attend up to three of the following presentations: negative childhood experiences, changing the narrative about mental health and suicide, acknowledging the deadly means used for suicide, Make It OK community campaign to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness, resilience, suicide prevention and more.


“This is the first time we’ve hosted this event,” Johnson said. “The overall goal is to offer these programs on a regular basis in our community.”

A light meal will be served and registration is required to attend, which can be done online at

bit.ly/3DDewHV

.

“We really wanted to reach out to people and find out what their needs are that we may not be aware of, so that’s kind of what spurred this idea,” Johnson said.

When Essentia Health conducted its community health needs assessment this spring, one area identified was community mental wellness, Johnson said.

“When people were asked to rate the number of days they experienced ‘good mental health’, it was noted that people experienced fewer days of ‘good’ mental health during the month compared to investigation conducted in 2018,” Johnson wrote in a previous column. for the

Brainerd Expedition

.


The goal of the Community Mental Health Resource Fair is to reach those closest to the problem, but furthest from the decision-making.

“You will also have the opportunity to attend breakout sessions to share your perspective on the next step of this project: developing a community resilience plan,” Johnson said.

The hope of the event is not just to help people, but to find people who seek to help others.

“We also really want to train new people, because all of these programs are usually run by volunteers. … We really need more ambassadors to do this, so we can reach more people,” Johnson said. “I hope they want to take us back to the places where they work, where they pray…so that we can also go out into the community and do presentations.”

Over 70 people registered online as of Wednesday, October 26.

“Something that’s come out of COVID is understanding that our mental health matters,” Johnson said. “We were isolated. A lot of us had to move to a virtual world, and I think we learned how important it is to talk about your mental health.”

For more information on the Community Mental Health Resource Fair, visit

bit.ly/3DDewHV

.

FRANK LEE can be reached at 218-855-5863 or

frank.lee@brainerddispatch.com

. Follow him on Twitter at

www.twitter.com/DispatchFL

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Rio Rancho Announces New Community Center in Enchanted Hills https://sanshinzencommunity.org/rio-rancho-announces-new-community-center-in-enchanted-hills/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 00:27:47 +0000 https://sanshinzencommunity.org/rio-rancho-announces-new-community-center-in-enchanted-hills/ RIO RANCHO, NM — A new community center is in the works in a neighborhood of Rio Rancho that the city says is growing faster than it can keep up. That’s why they’re developing a new community center for all the people who flock to Enchanted Hills. They call it “The Hub” and they hope […]]]>

RIO RANCHO, NM — A new community center is in the works in a neighborhood of Rio Rancho that the city says is growing faster than it can keep up. That’s why they’re developing a new community center for all the people who flock to Enchanted Hills.

They call it “The Hub” and they hope it will be a place where people can exercise, relax, have meetings, etc.

“We are in the center of the Enchanted Hills. This will be the new community center, this will be brand new to the Enchanted Hills area. It will be something that has never been provided — services on the north end of Rio Rancho — since the city has been here,” Rio Rancho Councilman Bob Tyler said.

The project will cost just over $3 million, but the city says it saved a lot of money by remodeling an existing space.

“50% less than it would cost to build from scratch,” Tyler said.

The Hub is currently taking shape in an 11,000 square foot building on Enchanted Hills Plaza near several shops and restaurants.

“In doing so, it creates a great atmosphere for people, as far as the residents of the area are concerned,” Tyler said. “Really, what I’m most excited about is our library, because that’s going to be a great part of it all.”

The Hub will also include several pickleball courts.

“It will be our sports ground and our meeting room here. So the pickleball courts will be indoors, and I’ve already had many people in the community, not just in Rio Rancho, but Bernalillo and Albuquerque already wanting to plan pickleball courts, they can’t find enough pickleball courts,” Tyler said.

The city says people will be able to meet and work here too.

“So if the communities want – the community groups want to come and have meetings, we will have it. There will be office space, there will be staff hired here every day. So it’s gonna be awesome,” Tyler said.

There is still a lot of work to do before the Hub opens to the public. The city is aiming for spring 2023, so less than a year before it is operational.

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